Food & Beverage

  • July 18, 2024

    9th Circ. Signals Support for Alaska Salmon Fishery

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Thursday leaned toward allowing government-approved commercial salmon fishing in Southeast Alaska, with one judge saying the economic hardship indigenous communities would face without fishing outweighs the "enormous uncertainty" of impacts on a small population of orca whales that feed on the fish.

  • July 18, 2024

    FDA Sends More Warnings Over THC 'Copycat' Snacks

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned six companies to stop selling delta-8 edibles that resemble brand-name snacks such as Skittles, Chips Ahoy, Cheetos and Oreos, saying the lookalikes can fool "children or unsuspecting adults" and pose a real health hazard.

  • July 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Looks To Wash Hands Of WOTUS Appeal

    An exasperated Sixth Circuit panel on Thursday looked for an easy way to dispatch Kentucky's and industry groups' appeal of the dismissal of their challenges to a federal government rule defining the scope of the Clean Water Act.

  • July 18, 2024

    Red Lobster Angles To Keep More Than 100 Leases In Ch. 11

    Red Lobster's well-known Times Square location in New York City is off the chopping block of potential closures, for now, along with 112 other outposts of the casual dining seafood chain, after the troubled company said during a bankruptcy court hearing Thursday it is negotiating new agreements with landlords.

  • July 18, 2024

    6th Circ. Questions If Kellogg 401(k) Claims Can Be Arbitrated

    A Sixth Circuit panel on Thursday suggested the terms of Kellogg Co.'s retirement plan may bar a former accountant from bringing claims the plan was mismanaged, as the company tries to enforce an arbitration clause that arguably prevents planwide relief. 

  • July 18, 2024

    Tender Greens And Tocaya Hit Ch. 11 With Post-COVID Woes

    The Los Angeles-based casual restaurant chain that operates Tender Greens and Mexican eatery Tocaya, One Table Restaurant Brands LLC, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday in Delaware bankruptcy court, with its CEO saying the COVID-19 pandemic was "catastrophic" to their business.

  • July 17, 2024

    NJ Casino Must Face Demoted Slots Director's Bias Suit

    A New Jersey appellate panel Wednesday restored a former Resorts Casino Hotel employee's disability discrimination and retaliation lawsuit, finding that it was unclear if he was disabled after he suffered severe burns in an explosion aboard his boat.

  • July 17, 2024

    Wahlburgers-Tied Pickle Co. Settles Rival's Labeling Spat

    A pickle company told a New Jersey federal court that its suit accusing a rival of ripping off recipes to make mislabeled pickles for actor Mark Wahlberg's restaurant business has been settled. 

  • July 17, 2024

    Whirlpool Wants To Wash Away Service Plan Repair Claims

    Whirlpool asked a Washington federal judge to send a proposed consumer class action down the drain, saying the aggrieved customer can't claim she was deceived about the details of an extended repair plan for a dishwasher when the full terms have always been easy to find online.

  • July 17, 2024

    Jimmy John's Biometric Info Suit 'Barely' Avoids Dismissal

    An Illinois federal judge refused Wednesday to toss a putative class action alleging Jimmy John's LLC unlawfully records customers via technology embedded in drive-through intercoms in violation of the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act, but he remarked on the "thinness" of the allegations and said the complaint "barely" survives.

  • July 17, 2024

    Ill. Judge Signals Issue With Chicken Consumers' Expert

    An Illinois federal judge signaled Wednesday that he was unlikely to allow chicken end users' economics expert to testify about damages they suffered in an alleged price-fixing conspiracy if the expert cannot focus his opinion on just the conduct allowed to be heard at trial.

  • July 17, 2024

    NC Must Use Smithfield Foods Funds For Schools, Judge Says

    North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein can no longer get his hands on $2 million a year from Smithfield Foods to give out environmental grants to private entities after a judge ruled the state constitution requires the money to be used in public schools.

  • July 17, 2024

    New Mexico Adds Superfund Claims To PFAS Suit Against US

    New Mexico is expanding its lawsuit against the federal government over costs related to cleaning up forever chemicals near military sites by utilizing a new rule listing the substances as hazardous under the Superfund law.

  • July 17, 2024

    Chamber Of Commerce Urges Justices To Limit RICO's Reach

    Business groups including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce are urging the U.S. Supreme Court not to extend the scope of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act to include personal injury-related claims in civil suits, in a case over alleged false advertisement of hemp-derived CBD products.

  • July 17, 2024

    IHOP Owner Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Religious Bias Suit

    An IHOP restaurant agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve a suit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing the business of firing a Christian cook because he asked to take Sundays off to attend church, a filing in North Carolina federal court said.

  • July 16, 2024

    FTC's In-House Kroger Case Delayed Until After Fed Suit

    Kroger and Albertsons are getting a limited respite from the Federal Trade Commission's looming in-house merger challenge after an agency administrative law judge agreed to delay the case, but only until immediately after an Oregon federal court fight plays out.

  • July 16, 2024

    GNC Fights Claim 'Super Magnesium' Pills Are Subpar

    GNC Holdings urged an Illinois federal judge Monday to toss a proposed class action alleging it falsely touted "Super Magnesium" supplements as having 400 milligrams of magnesium despite having less than half that amount, saying a consumer lacked standing to sue by failing to allege his own purchase was deficient.

  • July 16, 2024

    Pollution Settlement Will Work To Restore Wash. River Habitat

    An agreement between the federal government, Washington state and two tribes, on one side, and a pair of recycling companies and a metal fabricator on the other will put in place a three-acre habitat restoration project along the Lower Duwamish River in Seattle, resolving claims that oil and hazardous were released into the waters for a decade.

  • July 16, 2024

    Whataburger Wants Out Of Worker's 401(k) Fund Suit

    Whataburger urged a Texas federal judge to throw out a former employee's proposed class action accusing it of stocking its employees' $215 million retirement plan with poorly performing funds, saying the worker waived his right to sue when he signed a severance agreement.

  • July 16, 2024

    Cold Brew Co. Inks Deal To End IP Suit Against Mug Maker

    A Colorado federal judge has signed off on a cold brew equipment maker and insulated mug company's request to dismiss a trademark infringement suit after the companies agreed to end the fight and pay for their own costs.

  • July 16, 2024

    Judge Spikes Fee Bid Pending Edible Arrangements Appeal

    A Georgia federal judge is denying for now 1-800-Flowers.com's push to recover up to $4.3 million in attorney fees, as its rival Edible Arrangements LLC appeals a ruling that ended its trademark infringement suit against the company.

  • July 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Denies US Cos. Interest From Late Duty Payments

    Domestic companies that are entitled to antidumping and countervailing duty payments under the now-defunct Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act aren't entitled to the interest that accrues when the tariff is paid late, the Federal Circuit ruled.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

  • July 16, 2024

    These Firms Have The Most Diverse Equity Partnerships

    Law360’s law firm survey shows that firms' efforts to diversify their equity partner ranks are lagging. But some have embraced a broader talent pool at the equity partner level. Here are the ones that stood out.

  • July 15, 2024

    Tribes Fight Red States' Bid To Halt EPA Water Rule

    Tribal nations are seeking to challenge a bid by red states in North Dakota federal court to block a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule revision requiring states to consider tribes in addressing water quality standards under the Clean Water Act, arguing that the agency has the power to change its regulations.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • A Look At State AGs Supermarket Antitrust Enforcement Push

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    The ongoing antitrust intervention by state attorneys general in the proposed Kroger and Albertsons merger suggests that states are straying from a Federal Trade Commission follow-on strategy in the supermarket space, which involved joining federal investigations or lawsuits and settling for the same divestment remedies, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • Series

    After Chevron: USDA Rules May Be Up In The Air

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    The Supreme Court's end of Chevron deference may cause more lawsuits against U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations, like the one redefining "unfair trade practices" under the Packers and Stockyards Act, or a new policy classifying salmonella as an adulterant in certain poultry products, says Bob Hibbert at Wiley.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Navigating The New Rise Of Greenwashing Litigation

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    As greenwashing lawsuits continue to gain momentum with a shift in focus to carbon-neutrality claims, businesses must exercise caution and ensure transparency in their environmental marketing practices, taking cues from recent legal challenges in the airline industry, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

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    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • Constitutional Protections For Cannabis Companies Are Hazy

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    Cannabis businesses are subject to federal enforcement and tax, but often without the benefit of constitutional protections — and the entanglement of state and federal law and conflicting judicial opinions are creating confusion in the space, says Amber Lengacher at Purple Circle.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

  • Anticipating Disputes In Small Biz Partnerships And LLCs

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    In light of persistently high failures of small business partnerships and limited liability companies, mediator Frank Burke discusses proactive strategies for protecting and defining business rights and responsibilities, as well as reactive measures for owners.

  • Opinion

    Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

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