Immigration

  • June 20, 2024

    Logistics Cos. Face Skilled Worker Visa Misuse Class Action

    A pair of logistics companies in the United States face a proposed worker class action alleging they misled prospective employees in Mexico about purported engineering roles that, in reality, were menial labor.

  • June 20, 2024

    Judge Flags Iowa's Blocked Immigration Law In Texas Battle

    The Texas federal judge overseeing the Biden administration's challenge to a state law authorizing the deportation of noncitizens urged the parties to inform the Fifth Circuit of an order blocking Iowa's similar law, anticipating an Eighth Circuit review of Iowa's defeat.

  • June 20, 2024

    Staffing Co. To Pay $558K To End DOJ Immigrant Bias Probe

    The U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday that a staffing firm will pay nearly $558,000 to end an investigation into its hiring practices that found it deterred non-U.S. citizens with permission to work in the country from applying for open job opportunities.

  • June 20, 2024

    Spanish Fluency Goal Defeats H-2B Tutor Application

    The U.S. Department of Labor refused to grant a woman's H-2B visa application to hire a foreign Spanish-language tutor for her children, ruling that the goal to attain Spanish fluency was at odds with the temporary nature of the nonimmigrant visa program.

  • June 20, 2024

    Transport Co.'s Missing Worksite Info Dooms H-2B Request

    An agricultural transportation company's efforts to hire 28 truckers through the H-2B seasonal visa program were doomed by a job order that lacked specific information on the truckers' driving routes, according to a recent U.S. Department of Labor decision.

  • June 20, 2024

    Texas Says DACA Challenge Withstands Mifepristone Ruling

    Texas has fired back against the Biden administration's claim that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent blockbuster abortion-drug mifepristone ruling undermines the Lone Star State's standing to challenge the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, telling the Fifth Circuit that the appellate court "has held — repeatedly — that Texas has standing in this context."

  • June 20, 2024

    Fla. Calls Abortion Drug Case Irrelevant To Migrant Parole Suit

    Florida has rebuffed the Biden administration's efforts to use a high court ruling maintaining access to the abortion drug mifepristone to nix challenges to its migrant parole policies, telling the Eleventh Circuit that the healthcare case is unrelated to the immigration one.

  • June 18, 2024

    Texas Atty Pares Border Phone Search Suit To Just APA Claim

    A Texas attorney has significantly trimmed a lawsuit over cellphone searches at the border, dismissing claims he brought under the First and Fourth Amendments but leaving intact allegations the practice represents a violation of the federal Administrative Procedure Act.

  • June 18, 2024

    Feds Say Discovery Order Exposes Migrants To Retaliation

    The U.S. Department of Labor is urging a Mississippi federal court to reconsider ordering the disclosure of informants' identities in an investigation into a fish farm's labor practices, saying the May order exposed the informants, who are also migrant employees at the farm, to possible retaliation.

  • June 18, 2024

    GAO Rejects Claim CBP Rigged Migrant Facility Contract Bids

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Monday denied a vendor's protest challenging the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's solicitation seeking vendors to provide an immigrant detention facility in North Eagle Pass, Texas, rejecting the protester's allegations that the solicitation process was rigged to unfairly favor an incumbent contractor.

  • June 18, 2024

    Calif. Staffing Firm Settles DOJ's Noncitizen Bias Claims

    A California staffing agency must pay penalties and revise its employment policies as part of a settlement to resolve allegations of discrimination against foreigners by demanding certain types of documents to prove work authorization, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Monday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Feds Ease Green Card Process For Mixed-Status Families

    President Joe Biden announced Tuesday that certain foreigners who are married to U.S. citizens and their children can apply for green cards without leaving the U.S.

  • June 17, 2024

    Iowa's Controversial Immigration Law Temporarily Blocked

    An Iowa federal judge Monday temporarily blocked a controversial state law empowering local officials to arrest and remove previously deported individuals, even if they're now authorized to be in the country, ruling that the measure is trumped by federal law and therefore invalid.

  • June 17, 2024

    Mifepristone Ruling Means End Of Texas DACA Suit, Feds Say

    A Texas-led coalition of states doesn't have standing to challenge the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program after the U.S. Supreme Court's blockbuster decision rejecting a challenge to the abortion drug mifepristone, the Biden administration told the Fifth Circuit on Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    Bouncer Admits To Promoting Prostitution After $5.7M Sting

    A 41-year-old bouncer at a Connecticut strip club pled guilty Monday to facilitating prostitution and received a promise from the prosecution to recommend a reduced sentence as authorities press separate cases against a club boss who allegedly hid $5.7 million in income without reporting it to the Internal Revenue Service.

  • June 17, 2024

    Foreign Investors Sue Over Lost $7.7M NYC Mall Investment

    Fourteen foreign investors who lost the entirety of their $7.7 million investment in a New York City shopping mall project filed suit against two lenders, a developer and the manager of an EB-5 lender in New York federal court, saying they are owed damages.

  • June 17, 2024

    Weigh Therapist's Opinion In Deportation Case, 4th Circ. Says

    A divided Fourth Circuit on Monday revived a Mexican woman's efforts to stay in the country, faulting an immigration judge for not considering the impact of his deportation order on the woman's clinically depressed daughter.

  • June 17, 2024

    'No Religious Freedom In Texas' If El Paso Org. Shut Down

    An attorney for a Catholic nonprofit accused by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton of smuggling or harboring migrants told an El Paso judge Monday that Paxton shouldn't be able to use an "ancient" legal procedure in his attempt to shut it down.

  • June 17, 2024

    Don't Let Farm Org Rewrite Wage Rule Suit, DOL Tells Judge

    A farm group shouldn't be allowed to revise its challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's new wage rule for certain temporary workers, the agency told a Charlotte, North Carolina, federal judge, saying the revision attempt comes too late as the matter is already awaiting the judge's decision.

  • June 17, 2024

    Nursing Home Co. Owes Fees On Staffing Deal, Recruiter Says

    An international recruiter has accused the owners of nursing homes and assisted living communities in several states of failing to fork over fees for placing nurses and nursing assistants in their facilities, saying they owe over $3.4 million in outstanding fees.

  • June 14, 2024

    Fla. Court Says Navy Vet Can Sue CNN For Punitive Damages

    A Florida state appellate court has ruled that a Navy veteran turned private contractor can include punitive damages in his defamation lawsuit against CNN, saying he made a "sufficient preliminary evidentiary showing" of malice over the network's reporting on evacuating citizens of Afghanistan in 2021.

  • June 14, 2024

    Due Process At Stake As Justices Back 2-Step Removal Notice

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision that immigration hearing notices need not include the time and place of removal hearings for in absentia removal orders to be upheld could lead to further erosion of due process in removal proceedings, experts said.

  • June 14, 2024

    Fla. Says Justices' Ruling Dooms Suit Against State Law

    Florida tried Friday to bolster its arguments against a farmworker group challenging a state law that criminalizes the transportation of unauthorized immigrants, arguing that the U.S. Supreme Court's decision Thursday over access to an abortion medication undercuts the group's quest for standing.

  • June 14, 2024

    Challenge To Faulty Removal Order Stays Alive

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims kept alive an immigrant's effort to get the federal government to pay for a flawed removal order that tore his family apart and stranded him in Mexico but transferred the matter to California federal court.

  • June 14, 2024

    GOP AGs Demand Stay For DOL's H-2A Protections Rule

    Seventeen Republican attorneys general requested a pause on the effective date for the U.S. Department of Labor's final rule covering foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program, telling the court that the rule provides protections that U.S. citizen agricultural workers lack under federal labor law.

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Expert Analysis

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

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